Undefeated Nigerian Superstar – Gifted Cole

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Gifted Cole Chiori, is an undefeated professional boxer based in the United States- originally from Nigeria. Gifted is a welterweight fighter, with a current record of 11-0. He has fought professionally In Nigeria, Ghana, South Africa, and the United States.

His last bout, was internationally televised by Super Sports from Accra, Ghana, and was attended by President John Mahama, and over 25,000 spectators. The fight was stopped in the 6th round, as his opponent could not continue.

Gifted won the official Intercontinental WBF Title by way of knockout on November 9, 2013, against German opponent Tom Reiche. The self- promoted event in Atlanta, was graced by thousands of his Nigerian supporters and dignitaries from all over the United States. He has earned the respect and admiration of fans all around the world, and continues to entertain them with his unique style of fighting. Chiori was also honored by the Minister of Works Honorable Arc Mike Onolememen at the prestigious ‘Face Award USA’ for Sports Athlete of the Year in Atlanta, GA, and has many U.S. based Nigerian fans who greatly support his efforts.

Gifted is currently training to fight his next opponent this July in Australia and plans to promote several more fights before the end of the year in the United States, and possibly in Nigeria. He sees the potential for the growth of boxing as a major source of entertainment, and has his eyes set on bringing boxing back to Nigeria in a big way. His campaign to ‘Bring Vegas to Nigeria’, will require stakeholders that share in his vision to make Nigeria a desirable location to breed and promote elite professional boxing.

Gifted is proud to continuously provide guidance for less fortunate youth through his charity work in Nigeria. He has single- handedly funded and promoted boxing clinics and tournaments for at risk youth, and does his part to provide them with the necessary equipment and facilities to sharpen their skills in boxing. Many of the participants are being groomed by Chiori’s team for a career in boxing, with hopes of bringing them to train and fight in America in the form of an exchange program. Chiori is looking forward to partner with anyone who shares in his vision, and welcomes all support.

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For more info about Cole contact us at afriqtalk57@yahoo.com or visit our contact page.

PRESS RELEASE – IAAN 2013 GLOBAL SUMMIT ON NGO EMPOWERMENT 09/5-8/13

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Over 1000 participants from various parts of Africa, Caribbean and Latin America will attend the International Association of African Non-Governmental Organizations (IAAN) 2013 Global Summit on NGO Empowerment scheduled for September 5th 2013 to September 8th 2013 at the Hilton Hotel Rockville MD, in the United States of America. The theme of this conference is “Empowering NGOs in the Age of Globalization” Attendees include NGOs, Business men and Women, Political leaders, Philanthropists, Investors and other stake holders.

IAAN believes that NGOs are at the center of sustainable social and economic development, poverty reduction and environmental protection. When NGOs are empowered societies benefit. In today’s complex world, it’s increasingly important for NGOs, the private sectors and governments to work collaboratively to help meet the Millennium development goals (MDGs) as it relates to issues concerning women and children. NGOs in developing nations face major challenges in their efforts to meet the MDGs, largely due to lack of resources and funding. These NGOs are typically founded by individuals, who despite their financial challenges are doing the best they can to better the lives of their fellow man.

IAAN strives to create global awareness and harness resources internationally to enhance their services to various communities. For this year’s conference we are bringing together NGOs, the private sector and political leaders from various parts of Africa, Caribbean and Latin America and philanthropists to engage in discussions on how to work collaboratively to help meet the Millennium development goals (MDGs) as it relates to issues concerning poverty in
developing nations. The conference will also feature International speakers with a variety of topics, ranging from Human Rights issues to Global Health, Information Systems Technology, Climate Change and Sustainable Technology.

At the award night, the NGOs that have shown excellence in their service to improve the lives of the poor will receive awards and grants to enable them continue the good works. IAAN is the voice for thousands of NGOs in developing nations who are doing great charity work. IAAN creates global awareness for our member NGOs, through networking regionally and internationally, while assisting them in enhancing their programs and activities; this includes restructuring the NGOs if need be, for global competition. We share a vision in which African people are empowered to improve their daily lives.

Additional information can be found at our website at www.inafricangos.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – THE 4TH ANNUAL NIGERIAN LEADERSHIP SUMMIT 2013

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THE 4TH ANNUAL NIGERIAN LEADERSHIP SUMMIT 2013

New York, NY – June 12, 2013: On August 16-17, 2013, LEAD Nigeria will host the 4th Annual Nigerian Leadership Summit at the Hotel Pennsylvania, downtown New York. Guided by the theme: “Developing a Roadmap for Engaging the Nigerian Diaspora in Development”, the summit will provide an opportunity for Nigerians in the diaspora especially the youth to extensively discuss and equip themselves with strategic information, knowledge and resources necessary to make viable contribution to Nigerian development by acquiring the skills and tools needed for engaging their fellow peers in good governance and societal development.

Specifically, this year’s summit will focus on how the Nigerian Diaspora-based and Nigerian-based youth can work together to generate and share new ideas, learn about best practices of creating empowerment programs and project management, create opportunities to collaborate and forge partnerships that will enhance the prospects of developmental change within the Nigerian youth population, while shaping a broad development vision as the center piece and framework of cooperation between youths and the government.

As part of the leadership summit, from August 12-15, 2013 – Lead Nigeria in partnership with The Council of Young African Leaders will host 40 Nigerian youth leaders and activists from Nigeria for a 3 day Leadership Empowerment training retreat focused on building their leadership, organizational and community service skills with the goal of designing and organizing a project of choice to be carried out in Nigeria, a project that will impact the lives of members of the community within a year.

A special feature of the Nigerian Leadership summit 2013 will be the launch of the LEAD Nigeria fellowship program. The LEAD Nigeria fellowship program will provide selected Diaspora Nigerians annually with the opportunity to participate, intern, volunteer or work on a program of choice in Nigeria for 3 months in areas such as youth empowerment, leadership development, entrepreneurship, media, healthcare, education and vocational skills training, providing an in-depth understanding of issues threatening the survival and development of youths and young people with an intensive mentoring and training module to develop relationships with on-going projects and highly committed and accomplished youth leaders working collaboratively to motivate and inspire their fellow peers in particular and their community in general

The Nigerian Leadership Summit is expected to attract about 200 participants from across the United States, Canada, the UK and Nigeria, with emphasis on providing opportunities for current youth leaders and professionals leading developmental change campaigns and initiative to actively be involved and engaged in the programs dialogue.

To register for the Nigerian Leadership Summit 2013, Click Register Here

For sponsorship, partnership and all other form of support and inquiries, email events@leadnigeria.org

For more information about past Nigerian Leadership summit programs, Click Here

AWARD WINNING NIGERIAN MUSIC DUO BRACKET HONORED BY THE CITY AND STATE OF PHILADELPHIA

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Award winning and top selling contemporary Nigerian-style African-pop duo Bracket, after receiving citation from the city and State of Philadelphia at the African American Museum on Friday August 3rd, 2012, highlighted the exciting stage line up at the 5th Annual ACANA African Festival on Sunday, August 5th, 2012 from 2:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The festival took place at the River Stage on the Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing, a part of PECO Multicultural series.

Stage performances represented the African countries of Nigeria, Liberia, Congo,  Sierra Leone, and many others. They performed along with the musical sensation Bracket will be the sensational LIB Queen from Monrovia, Liberia, Rafiya, a Congolese artist, and Jay Q from Sierra Leone.

Other performers throughout the day included: Black Diamond, Peter Cole, Chillton Jah James, Rotimi & De Afrophonik Crew, and Sista Rose. Dance is also an important highlight of the ACANA African Festival. Also, taking the stage was the world famous Universal Dance & Drum Ensemble.

In previous years, ACANA Cultural Festival had brought on stage such big name artists like Maxi Priest of Jamaica, Trinidad’s queen of soca music Joan Tigress Rowley, as well as Liberia’s Gebah Swaray of the Safari Band. This year’s event featured Bracket who were set to repeat the success of the previous festivals, until they got rained in during their performance. See the below preview of concert.

Along with presenting sponsor, PECO, the festival is also sponsored by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts through the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, AfriQtalk, Brown Family Shop Rite, Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health, Children Crisis Treatment Center, , Arik Airlines, Western Union, Cozen O’Connor, Philadelphia Mayor’s Commission on African & Caribbean Immigrant Affairs, The Welcoming Center, Chester Ave. Business Association, Funtimes Magazine, Liberian United Women In Progress,  PNC Bank, and IT Solutions.

Bracket is one of the top selling contemporary Nigerian-style African-pop musicians. Bracket’s music is a composition of traditional Nigerian rhythms with contemporary pop and hip-hop influences.

Press Release – BRACKET To Receive Honorary Award from the City of Philadelphia

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The group Bracket is fast becoming a house hold name in North America, thanks to their fans and supporters. The Enugu born duo is poised to receive a Honorary award from the city of Philadelphia at the African American Museum of Philadelphia in a Banquet event, August 3, 2012. They will join the likes of Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey who received a similar recognition in Boston.

Nominated for Best Indigenous Artist/Group at the Nigerian Entertainment Awards in New York, September 2, 2012. The group has won many awards, including NMVA 2009 Best Hi-Life Video Wedding planner song of the year award 2009 Museke Africa Song of the Year award 2010, Soundcity Nominee for Discovery of the year 2009 and becoming the most sought after artistes by show promoters in the African Disaporas and around the globe .

They aren’t slowing down and are taking North America by storm with their new album release, girl featuring award winning Wizkid BET best international act, even though Yori Yori still remains indisputably the most popular. Also, they will be performing at the 5th Annual African Music Festival, September 5, 2012. A three days event kicking off a one month tour in the U.S. Click the following link for more info http://t.co/XzWuuefW

Bracket is brought to you by ACANA and AfriQtalk in collaboration with the African American Museum of Philadelphia, Delaware River Waterfront Corporation, and Peco Energy. Sponsored by the Philadelphia Mayor’s Commission on African & Caribbean Immigrant Affairs, Department of Behavioral Health & Intellectual Disabilities, Children Crisis Treatment Center, Browns Family Shoprite, Cozen O’Connor, The Welcoming Center, Chester Avenue Business Association, Funtimes Magazine, and Liberian United Women in Progress.

Who is ACANA? African Cultural Alliance of North America Inc., ACANA was founded in Southwest Philadelphia in 1999 in order to bridge the gap between African immigrants and the existing African American communities in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, an area of the city where most of the agency’s targeted clients, (African refugees, asylum seekers, and other immigrant populations) have been resettled. ACANA was originally started by Voffee Jabateh, MSW, as a cultural organization to support African artists/ musicians in their efforts to establish themselves within the United States.

The goal is to help African immigrant artists ensure continuity within their new location, as well as to assist in cultural preservation within this new environment. However, due to overwhelming requests for additional help by the ever-expanding population of African refugee, asylee and immigrant community members in dealing with the stressors associated with adjusting to their new community; ACANA was incorporated in 1999 as a non-profit social service agency. For information about BRACKET-MANIA TOUR  click here  http://t.co/XzWuuefW. To purchase your tickets for  3 days ACANA African Music Festival, click the following link http://acanafestweekend.eventbrite.com/. A family event that you don’t want to miss.

Mama G Live at Miss Nigeria Cultural Pageant 2012, Miami, FL

We’re specialized in promoting African culture, art of fine living, entertainment and networking. We work with organizations, promoters, small businesses, independent artist, celebrities, beginners and established personalities. AfriQtalk is a market place for client referrals for the delivery of products, goods and services. We handle diverse range of PR projects, with the launching of our new platform, AfriQtalk African Treasures TV (ATAT); we are repositioning Africa in the 21st century.

MURPHY’S LAAW ENTERTAINMENT OFFICIALLY BRINGS MAMA TO THE US. MEET MAMA GEE UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL AT MISS NIGERIA FLORIDA CULTURAL PAGEANT, USA MIAMI. AFTER THE PARTY IS AN ALL WHITE AFTER PARTY. COME CELEBRATE MY AWARD BASH PARTY WITH ME, IZZY ENTERTAINMENT AND AFRIQTALK CREW IN THE HOUSE. OH LADIES DON’T FORGET TO BRING YOUR BEACH SWIM SUITES IT’S GOING TO BE OH MY GOSH…..CRUNKED UP! FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY.

AfriQtalk, Ras Kimono, Iktune Ny and Others wins award at the 2012 NPA USA Annual Summit

The 2nd edition of the Nigerian Promoters Association USA Entertainment Awards 2012 was held in AYVA  Center, Houston, Texas, May 25-27. The event was  filled with distinguished Nigerian celebrities, artists, models and ex-crowned beauties with a night of comedy and entertainment. The after party was hosted by Princess Belemzy at Face 2 Lounge, while the pre-award party was held at Zanzibar Lounge, Saturday May 26, 2012. Some of the award winners in attendance were  legendary Ras Kimono, Princess Asha okojie, Chisom Orgi, Emma Agu, Kenny Kay, Bolaji Dawodu, Eva Banks and Princess Belemzy.  (See full list below).

NPA Annual summit is an annual meeting of Entertainment Administrators who are members and non-members of NPA, such as; promoters, music producers, event planners, record label companies, Artiste managers, Deejays, Entertainment media personalities, film producers, fashion designers, Arts, sports e.t.c., coming together to share ideas and deliberate thoroughly on how to better improve the standard of Pan African Entertainment industry particularly in the North America.

NPA ENTERTAINMENT AWARD WINNERS

    CATEGORIES                                                                   WINNERS

1.         BEST MEDIA PERSONALITY                                Princess Asha Okojie

2.         BEST COLLABORATION                                        Kenny Kay

3.         BEST NEW ACT OF THE YEAR                            A Cue

4.         BEST GOSPEL MUSICIAN                                       Chisom Orji

5.         INDIGENOUS ARTIST OF THE YEAR     Yinka “Mr. Somebody” Quadri

6.         BEST R&B ARTIST OF THE YEAR                       Koleurz

7.         BEST DEEJAY OF THE YEAR (U.S.A)                Dj Donn

8.         BEST COMEDIAN OF THE YEAR                         Seyi Brown

9.         BEST FEMALE MUSIC VIDEO OF THE YEAR    Titi Lo’kei

10.      BEST NEXT RATED ARTIST                                   Popasay

11.       BEST MALE MUSIC VIDEO OF THE YEAR         Dking Rokan

12.       BEST POP ARTIST OF THE YEAR                         Gloria Maduka

13.       BEST AFRO HIPHOP ARTIST                                Maxpain

14.       BEST MALE ACT OF THE YEAR                          Oshine

15.       BEST RAP ARTIST OF THE YEAR                        Doggext

16.       BEST GOSPEL INSTRUMENTALIST                   Kelvin Najite

17.       BEST PROMOTER OF THE YEAR                         Adewole Lipede

18.       BEST ENT. PHOTOGRAPHER                              Trendy Africa

19.       ENT. PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR                   Emma Agu

20.       BEST MOVIE PRODUCER OF THE YEAR          Evalonia Banks

21.       BEST ACTOR OF THE YEAR                                  Pascal Atuma

22.       BEST ACTRESS OF THE YEAR                             Chisom OZ’ lee

23.       BEST MOVIE DIRECTOR                                        Oliver Mbamara

24.       BEST MOVIE OF THE YEAR                                  Jj Bunny-This is  Houston

25.       BEST ENT. BLOG SITE OF THE YEAR                Coscanino-Underdarock

26.       BEST ENT. WEBSITE OF THE YEAR                   Emma Agu-Iktune

27.       BEST MUSIC SINGLE                                               SLV

28.       BEST FEMALE MODEL OF THE YEAR                Eeefy Ike

29.       BEST REGGAE/DANCEHALL ACT                       Cola Man

30.       BEST INDIGENOUS INSTRUMENTALIST          Bunmi Omega

31.       BEST FEMALE ACT OF THE YEAR                       Naira

32.       BEST PARTY PROMOTER OF THE YEAR            Princess Belemzy

33.       BEST FASHION DESIGNER                                    Kachi Designs

34.       BEST INTERNATIONAL MUSIC ACT                   Naeto C

35.  BEST INT’L NOLLYWOOD ACT                                  Funke Akindele

36.  BEST PROMOTION COMPANY OF THE YEAR       Emaginethat Entertainment

NPA HONORS HOUSTON 2012

1.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         LANRE ARABA

2.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         BOLAJI DAWODU

3.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         RAS KIMONO

4.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         BOLAJI AMUSAN

5.  HUMANITARIAN AWARD                      MARION AMANAMBU

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Love Don’t Hurt Stop The Violence Against Women

Do you know someone that might be in an abusive relationship? If so, tell them to walk away, and seek help because love don’t hurt. There are two types of domestic abuse, mental and physical abuse, which can result to low self esteem or control. Domestic violence can be defined as a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner. According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, women experience about 4.8 million intimate partner-related physical assaults and rapes every year. Less than 20 percent of battered women sought medical treatment following an injury.

Are men and  women equal? Take a listen to this video

Taking on violence against women in Africa By Mary Kimani

The incident was not unusual in Africa. In December 1998 a Kenyan police officer, Felix Nthiwa Munayo, got home late and demanded meat for his dinner. There was none in the house. Enraged, he beat his wife, Betty Kavata. Paralyzed and brain-damaged, Ms. Kavata died five months later, on her 28th birthday.

But unlike many such cases, Ms. Kavata’s death did not pass in silence. The Kenyan media covered the story extensively. Images of the fatally injured woman and news of her death generated nationwide debate on domestic violence. There followed five years of protests, demonstrations and lobbying by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), as well as by outraged men and parliamentarians. Finally, the government passed a family protection bill criminalizing wife-beating and other forms of domestic violence.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), violence affects millions of women in Africa. In a 2005 study on women’s health and domestic violence, the WHO found that 50 per cent of women in Tanzania and 71 per cent of women in Ethiopia’s rural areas reported beatings or other forms of violence by husbands or other intimate partners.

In South Africa, reports Amnesty International, about one woman is killed by her husband or boyfriend every six hours. In Zimbabwe, six out of 10 murder cases tried in the Harare High Court in 1998 were related to domestic violence. In Kenya, the attorney general’s office reported in 2003 that domestic violence accounted for 47 per cent of all homicides.
‘No boundaries’

Domestic violence is a global problem. In Europe, estimates the WHO, violence in the home is the primary cause of injury and death for women aged 16–44, more lethal than road accidents or cancer. Indeed, “violence against women,” said then-UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan in 1999, “knows no boundaries of geography, culture or wealth. It is perhaps the most shameful human rights violation.” And, he added, it is “perhaps the most pervasive.”

Violence against women goes beyond beatings. It includes forced marriage, dowry-related violence, marital rape, sexual harassment, intimidation at work and in educational institutions, forced pregnancy, forced abortion, forced sterilization, trafficking and forced prostitution.

Such practices cause trauma, injuries and death. Female genital cutting, for example, is a common cultural practice in parts of Africa. Yet it can cause “bleeding and infection, urinary incontinence, difficulties with childbirth and even death,” reports the WHO. The organization estimates that 130 million girls have undergone the procedure globally and 2 million are at risk each year, despite international agreements banning the practice.

Sexual violence is another problem. A local organization in Zaria, Nigeria, found that 16 per cent of patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were girls under the age of five, a sign of sexual assault. In the single year 1990, the Genito-Urinary Centre in Harare, Zimbabwe, treated more than 900 girls under 12 for STDs. Such assaults, observes a WHO publication, put “African women and girls at higher risk of sexually transmitted diseases [including HIV/AIDS] than men and boys.”
Rooted in culture

Abusers of women tend to view violence as the only way to solve family conflicts, according to a 1999 study on violence against women by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health near Baltimore, US. Perpetrators typically have a history of violent behavior, grew up in violent homes and often abuse alcohol and drugs.

However, violence against women, the Johns Hopkins study points out, goes beyond the brutalization of women by individuals. The prevalence of the phenomenon, “cuts across social and economic situations, and is deeply embedded in cultures around the world — so much so that millions of women consider it a way of life.”

In a report by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) in 2000, the agency noted that in interviews in Africa and Asia, “the right of a husband to beat or physically intimidate his wife” came out as “a deeply held conviction.” Even societies where women appear to enjoy better status “condone or at least tolerate a certain amount of violence against women.”

Such cultural norms put women in subservient positions in relation to their husbands and other males. That inferior status makes women “undervalued, disrespected and prone to violence by their male counterparts,” observed a 2003 report by the UN Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM). Ms. Radhika Coomaraswamy, the former UN special rapporteur on violence against women, agreed, noting that discriminatory norms, combined with economic and social inequalities, “serve to keep women subservient and perpetuate violence by men against them.”

Focusing specifically on Africa, Ms. Heidi Hudson found in a 2006 study by the South African Institute of Security Studies that “the subservient status of women, particularly rural women, in many African countries is deeply rooted in tradition.”

This is true to such an extent, Ms. Hudson added, that women can be perceived as objects or property, a view reflected especially clearly in practices such as wife inheritance and dowry payments.

Here are some ways to help a friend who is being abused:

  • Set up a time to talk. Try to make sure you have privacy and won’t be distracted or interrupted.
  • Let your friend know you’re concerned about her safety. Be honest. Tell her about times when you were worried about her.
  • Help her see that what she’s going through is not right. Let her know you want to help.
  • Be supportive. Listen to your friend. Keep in mind that it may be very hard for her to talk about the abuse. Tell her that she is not alone, and that people want to help.
  • Offer specific help. You might say you are willing to just listen, to help her with childcare, or to provide transportation, for example.
  • Don’t place shame, blame, or guilt on your friend. Don’t say, “You just need to leave.” Instead, say something like, “I get scared thinking about what might happen to you.” Tell her you understand that her situation is very difficult.
  • Help her make a safety plan. Safety planning includes picking a place to go and packing important items.
  • Encourage your friend to talk to someone who can help. Offer to help her find a local domestic violence agency.
  • Offer to go with her to the agency, the police, or court.
  • If your friend decides to stay, continue to be supportive. Your friend may decide to stay in the relationship, or she may leave and then go back many times. It may be hard for you to understand, but people stay in abusive relationships for many reasons. Be supportive, no matter what your friend decides to do.
  • Encourage your friend to do things outside of the relationship. It’s important for her to see friends and family.
  • If your friend decides to leave, continue to offer support. Even though the relationship was abusive, she may feel sad and lonely once it is over. She also may need help getting services from agencies or community groups.
  • Keep in mind that you can’t “rescue” your friend. She has to be the one to decide it’s time to get help. Support her no matter what her decision.
  • Let your friend know that you will always be there no matter what.

16 Celebrities Who Support The Cause to End Violence Against Women.

Celebrity Anti-VAW Campaigner Number 1: Annie Lennox

When Royalty meets Entertainment “Dking” is born

Rokan Adekola was born in 1967 at Iboropa Akoko in Ondo State, South West of Nigeria to the Adekola Royal Family, a.k.a, DKing.  Rokan attended St Mark’s Primary School Iboropa Akoko and Fadeyi Primary School 3 where he completed his primary education and moved on to Birch Freeman High Schoolin Lagos for his secondary education. Because of his passion for music, he enrolled in His Grace School of Music, Lagos where he became a full time percussionist.

Popularly known as King Rokan is a US-based Nigerian songwriter, recording artiste and performer. His music is a contemporary mix of Afro-juju, Fuji and Gospel Highlife with a soulful touch of traditional Yoruba rhythm. His songs are mostly in his Yoruba mother tongue and inspired by the desire to uplift and promote the rich indigenous culture of Africa.

Dking has performed at very important events around the world including; the opening ceremony of the 1996 Olympics and black history month. He has entertained three presidents; President Bill Clinton at the White House in 1993 with Bolu and the Roots of African Percussion and two former Nigerian presidents; Gen. Abdusalemi Abubakar in Washington DC and President Olusegun Obasanjoin Ohio.

Also, he performed live at the grand opening of Animal Kingdom in Disney world Orlando Florida. After Losing his parents at the tender age of 10, at 12 years old he was determined to work hard and be successful. King Rokan became the choir master of Eternal Order of Cherubim & Seraphim Church, Alpha ET Omega Ilasamaja in 1983. In 1986 he moved to the branch at Esuola Okota as music director.

In 1994, he relocated to Atlanta where he started the band King Rokan & The Royal Crew in 1997 and was the first Nigerian to start a live band in Atlanta. In 2001, when he released “Rock On”; he scored another first as the first Nigerian artiste to release an album and a video the same day in America. “Showtime” followed in 2003, “4GveDem” in 2005, “Thank U God” in 2008 and “Oba Tide” in 2010 which was produced by Yinka Ayefele and Puffy Tee.

As a promoter and music entrepreneur, King Rokan started Rokan Entertainment, a music promotion and artiste management outfit. On this platform, he has worked with and promoted Late DR Sikiru Ayinde Barrister- , Gen. Kollington Ayinla,Sir Shina Peters, Obesere, Adewale Ayuba, Yinka Ayefele, Just to mention few including K1 D Ultimate(King Wasiu Ayinde Marshall) who gave him the title of Oluaye of Georgia in 2002.

King Rokan’s eclectic style earned him the best Indigenous Artist of the year award at the N.P.A summit in Atlanta GA. He has a new single, recently launched in Lagos, Nigeria 12/15/2011, FT 2FACE “MAGBAGBE”(NO 4GET) PRODUCED BY FEMI OJETUNDE(FEM DOUBLE PRODUCTIONS). Kudos to you Dking http://facebook.com/kingrokan. You rock!

Benin Art of Ancient Nigeria

By Eno Louis Enobkhare

For once, here is a product from Nigeria that has no negative connotations and we are arguing about who said what and who went where. The article by Appolos, Oziogu is well put together. However, there are flaws here and there which ought to be addressed. First and foremost, the Bini people did not settle at Ife but there was a contact with Ife through the son of the last Ogiso. These topic I will not delve into in this article. We can not dwell in the past forever even though as the late Bob Marley reasoned, “in this great future we can not forget the past” We know that the Bini kingdom produced and still produces master peices no doubt, but can we answer the following questions? Ekpu wrote that Igbo Ukwu had a tradition of bronze casting, what happened to it? Iguaghae is a Benin name, how could he have been sent to his home land? What is the future of Bronze casting? This last question is what all of us should put on the front burner, not who sent who or who started what.

The issue of the burial rite of a Bini Oba is a closely kept secret that Egharevba could not have had access to. We must support postulation with empirical evidence. The mobile phone was invented by Scandinavian, so that people in their mountainous rural areas could communicate with each other. My immediate senior brother’s company in California designs chips for Nokia. All that is now history.Has the whole world embrace it? Bronze casting has been accepted as a world class product, so let us move on from there. It must not go under like it probably did in Igbo Ukwu and Ife. The ancient art of bronze casting is gradually going into extinction in Benin. There are outcry about lack of patronage, lack of raw materials. This is making brothers rise up against one another. We all have a collective role in preventing this catastrophe.

It is not only by writing articles in newspapers and creating controversy that leads us nowhere. My friend Peavey from Erkron, Ohio once said “the only way you can attract a white man’s attraction is by placing a monetary value to a hat you are selling. We can sell Benin bronze works, so how can we protect it’s production? Luckily,these objects are like Italian shoes, it cannot be mass produced. It has to go through the displays wax process for it to be authentic. Igun street where this masters pieces are produced, supervised by a strict guild employs families about 200 of them. It is by and large their only means of lively hood. This is their contribution to the nation’s GDP income what may. They need to be protected, patronised, promoted and subsidised and of course, celebrated. For once, here is a product from Nigeria that has no negative connotations and we are arguing about who said what and who went where.

Nigeria oil is not Ogoni oil and so is bronze casting. In more organised climes, Igun street will be a federal territory. All children from there will be on scholarship and study marketing skill in higher institutions to march their inherited skills. With a Minister of Culture, Mr Edem Duke, who seems to know his onions, we might get some results. The Edo Bronze Festival must be put in the calendar of festivals of Nigeria. This festival makes more sense than some heavily financed festivals that comes and goes without adding any value to our culture and traditions. The last 5 editions of the Bronze festival highlighted our potentials as a sophisticated people being debated on tweeter and face book, which let to the cancellation of an auction of a Benin bronze object by sothebys. “This is neat as Americans, will say.”

All government cultural agencies,private sector and enthusiasts, should please join hands with us to move this world class product forward. The corporate affairs Gtbank for instance, even after the demise of it’s boss, Mr. Tayo Aderinokun, a great outlaw, is still proud to associate with  the sponsorship of the Edo Bronze Festival.