PRESS RELEASE – IAAN 2013 GLOBAL SUMMIT ON NGO EMPOWERMENT 09/5-8/13

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Over 1000 participants from various parts of Africa, Caribbean and Latin America will attend the International Association of African Non-Governmental Organizations (IAAN) 2013 Global Summit on NGO Empowerment scheduled for September 5th 2013 to September 8th 2013 at the Hilton Hotel Rockville MD, in the United States of America. The theme of this conference is “Empowering NGOs in the Age of Globalization” Attendees include NGOs, Business men and Women, Political leaders, Philanthropists, Investors and other stake holders.

IAAN believes that NGOs are at the center of sustainable social and economic development, poverty reduction and environmental protection. When NGOs are empowered societies benefit. In today’s complex world, it’s increasingly important for NGOs, the private sectors and governments to work collaboratively to help meet the Millennium development goals (MDGs) as it relates to issues concerning women and children. NGOs in developing nations face major challenges in their efforts to meet the MDGs, largely due to lack of resources and funding. These NGOs are typically founded by individuals, who despite their financial challenges are doing the best they can to better the lives of their fellow man.

IAAN strives to create global awareness and harness resources internationally to enhance their services to various communities. For this year’s conference we are bringing together NGOs, the private sector and political leaders from various parts of Africa, Caribbean and Latin America and philanthropists to engage in discussions on how to work collaboratively to help meet the Millennium development goals (MDGs) as it relates to issues concerning poverty in
developing nations. The conference will also feature International speakers with a variety of topics, ranging from Human Rights issues to Global Health, Information Systems Technology, Climate Change and Sustainable Technology.

At the award night, the NGOs that have shown excellence in their service to improve the lives of the poor will receive awards and grants to enable them continue the good works. IAAN is the voice for thousands of NGOs in developing nations who are doing great charity work. IAAN creates global awareness for our member NGOs, through networking regionally and internationally, while assisting them in enhancing their programs and activities; this includes restructuring the NGOs if need be, for global competition. We share a vision in which African people are empowered to improve their daily lives.

Additional information can be found at our website at www.inafricangos.org

 

BLACK INVENTORS By Keith C. Holmes – A Must Read

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Black Inventors, Crafting Over 200 Years of Success identifies black inventors from five continents, over seventy countries, including almost all fifty states in the United States. Citing a number of black inventors from 1769 – 2007, this book is one of the most comprehensive works on black Inventors since Henry E. Baker’s research on Black inventors in the early 20th century.

Overall, the book shatters the ongoing myths about Africa whose history is limited to its continent’s colonial past, and about Africans who have contributed little to the development of world science, technology and agricultural innovations. Black Inventors demonstrates that the inventors, innovators, designers and labourers of African descent, in Africa as well as throughout the African Diaspora, were instrumental in the development of western technology.

Black Inventors, Crafting Over 200 Years of Success is available in over 800 national, state, university and public libraries (over 150), as well as in museums, schools and bookstores in 27 countries (primarily in North America). Black Inventors was selected as part of the reading list by the National Council of Teachers of English for the National African American Read-in since 2010.

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The author, Keith C. Holmes is of African-American, Native American and Jamaican ancestry.  In 1972, he went to the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick as a Liberal Arts Major. In 1980, he earned a certificate in computer programming and system designs at the Control Data InstituteKeith Holmes was born in Queens, New York and lives in Brooklyn. He is married and is the father of four children, three of whom went to university; the youngest is aspiring to do the same.

He has spent more than twenty years researching information on inventions by Black people from Australia, Barbados, Canada, France, Germany, Ghana, Haiti, Jamaica, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Trinidad and Tobago, just to name a few. For 25 years, he worked professionally in the satellite communications industry, and since 1977 he has worked with computers, from main frames to personal computers.

He has lectured in Barbados, California, Canada, Illinois, New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, DC. Holmes is currently working on several projects regarding Black inventors.  This book highlights the work of early black inventors from almost all fifty states in the United States.

The book cites famous inventors of color from around the world, giving librarians, teachers, students and parents a global view than can be included in African History, Black History Month and Caribbean History. Black Inventors documents a number of the inventions, patents and labor saving devices conceived by black inventors. It gives details about the first Black inventor who obtained a patent in both the Caribbean and the United States.

Africans, before the period of their enslavement, developed: agricultural tools, building materials, medicinal herbs, cloth and weapons, among many other inventions. Though millions of black people were brought to Canada, the Caribbean, Central and South America and the United States in chains and under the yoke of slavery, it is relatively unknown that thousands of Africans and their descendants developed numerous labor saving devices and inventions that spawned companies which generated money and jobs, worldwide.

The focus of this book is to introduce readers to the facts, that inventions created by black people, both past and present, were developed and patented on a global scale. This also means that there are inventors in every civilization whose ideas have been turned into inventions. In the past the focus has been on American and European inventors.

Today, the new giants in the patenting process are Brazil, China, India, Japan, Nigeria, South Africa and South Korea. Mr. Holmes documents the creativity of black women inventors from Africa, Canada, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom and the United States, and provides readers with a comprehensive view of the ground-breaking achievements of black inventors – both male and female.

This is one of the first books that address the diversity of black inventors and their inventions from a global perspective. The material available in this book is an introduction to the world of black inventors. It gives the reader, researcher, librarian, student, and teacher materials they needed to effectively understand that the Black inventor is not only a national phenomenon, but also a global giant.

For more information visit  http://www.globalblackinventor.com

King Jaja of Opobo – England’s Affair With Him And The End Of It


Born in Umuduruoha, Amaigbo in Igboland and sold as a slave to a Bonny trader at the age of twelve, he was named Jubo Jubogha by his first master. He was later sold to Chief Alali, the head of the Opubo Annie Pepple Royal House. Called Jaja by the British, this gifted and enterprising individual eventually became one of the most powerful men in the eastern Niger Delta.

In the nineteenth century—after the abolition of the slave trade in 1807—the trade in slaves was supplanted by the trade in palm oil, which was so vibrant that the region was named the Oil Rivers area.

The Houses in Bonny and other city-states controlled both the internal and external palm oil trade because the producers in the hinterland were forbidden to trade directly with the Europeans on the coast; the Europeans never left the coast for fear of malaria.

Astute in business and politics, Jaja became the head of the Anna Pepple House, extending its activities and influence by absorbing other houses, increasing operations in the hinterland and augmenting the number of European contacts. A power struggle ensued among rival factions in the houses at Bonny leading to the breakaway of the faction led by Jaja. He established a new settlement, which he named Opobo. He became King Jaja of Opobo and declared himself independent of Bonny.

Strategically located between Bonny and the production areas of the hinterland, King Jaja controlled trade and politics in the delta. In so doing, he curtailed trade at Bonny and fourteen of the eighteen Bonny houses moved to Opobo.

In a few years, he had become so wealthy that he was shipping palm oil directly to Liverpool. The British consul could not tolerate this situation. Jaja was offered a treaty of “protection”, in return for which the chiefs usually surrendered their sovereignty. After Jaja’s initial opposition, he was reassured, in vague terms, that neither his authority nor the sovereignty of Opobo would be threatened.

Jaja continued to regulate trade and levy duties on British traders, to the point where he ordered a cessation of trade on the river until one British firm agreed to pay duties. Jaja refused to comply with the consul’s order to terminate these activities, despite British threats to bombard Opobo. Unknown to Jaja, the Scramble for Africa had taken place and Opobo was part of the territories allocated to Great Britain. This was the era of gunboat diplomacy, where Great Britain used her naval power to negotiate conditions favorable to the British.

Lured into a meeting with the British consul aboard a warship, Jaja was arrested and sent to Accra, where he was summarily tried and found guilty of “treaty breaking” and “blocking the highways of trade”.

Jaja was forced into exile at St. Vincent, as a political prisoner, and placed on annual income of 800 pounds which was far below estimated at 50,000 pounds income per annum in Opobo, and where he enjoyed a lavish life style, in his three storey pre-fabricated house imported from Liverpool. He was to remain is St. Vincent, against his will, for three years, and for four additional month in Barbados, from where it was decided he should return home to Opobo from exile.

Meanwhile, Jaja’s health in exile began to deteriorate to the extent that his doctor in St. Vincent reported in 1899 that, the more Jaja was retained in St. Vincent the nearer he would approach his grave. Jaja report was threatening to commit suicide unless he was allowed to return.

It took another two years for Jaja to be evacuated from St. Vincent , from where in February, 1891, he was transferred to Barbados. He was to remain in Barbados for another three months before he was conveyed to Spanish colony of Teneriffe, instead of Sierra Lone, on May 11, 1891. The plan was for him to remain there until the arrival of the British consul, Macdonald who was to take him back to Opobo, but, due to an outbreak of epidemic in the island, Macdonald did not arrive in June as expected.

Consequently Jaja waited hopelessly and in abject misery, soon contracted dysentery from which he died on July 7, 1891, after nearly four years in exile. His body was buried at Teneriffe. But in October, 1892, his body was exhumed and taken to Opobo where on October 12, it was received by a fleet at 60 war canoes each carrying each of the old warriors of King Jaja.

Years after his exile in St. Vincent Jaja, is still remembered in anecdotes, today in the West Indies, as he stays there made the land favourable impact on the people of St. Vincent and Barbados. To them Jaja remained a legendary figure. He is remembered for upholding the diginity and self respect of the African even in the most difficult conditions in which he found himself while on exile in Caribbean.

Based on the illegal exile of King Jaja of Opobo in the Caribbean, the situation in the Delta today is not different. The same vicious struggle for the control of the oil resources in the Delta has continued in a post colonial and independent federal Nigeria. The British Buccaneers have been replaced by non-indigenous local predators, that in collusion with the big foreign-owned oil companies have seized control of vast oil resources in the Delta area in a manner that can not be said to serve the economic interest of the people of the Delta. Like Jaja, the people of the Delta want to control their own resources.

This is what is responsible for the rebellion of the people of Niger Delta and the continuing violence in the area. What the situation call for is some restitution with the people of the Delta through real fiscal federalism.

Legacy

King Jaja was exiled for many years in Barbados, the West Indies. Then due to immense civil unrest caused by the presence of King Jaja by the enslaved people of Barbados and after years of campaigning for his freedom. Jaja was moved to the island of San Vicente, Cape Verde, West Africa. To prevent the possibility of a slave revolt.

When Jaja eventually won his liberty after years of fighting against his wrongful abduction and consequent exile by the British. It was agreed by Parliament that he could be reunite to his Kingdom State of Opobo. Jaja now an old man and after years in exile in San Vicente, his health had deteriorated but this did not deter him from embarking on a British vessel bound for Opobo.

His health had failed and on his way back to his beloved Opobo Jaja died due to ill health. He was then shipped instead to Tenerife where he was buried. Due to the anger and fury felt by his people on the chain of events that had preceded, Opobians made the demand for the body of their King which was promptly exhumed and transported back to Opobo where Jaja was buried.

As a loved King his people never forgot about him nor gave up hope that one day he would return. When his body was returned they proceeded to honour him in a manor befitting a much loved & Powerful King (Amayanabo) with 2 years of mourning and with a ceremony immortalising Jaja as a deity.

AWARD WINNING NIGERIAN MUSIC DUO BRACKET HONORED BY THE CITY AND STATE OF PHILADELPHIA

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Award winning and top selling contemporary Nigerian-style African-pop duo Bracket, after receiving citation from the city and State of Philadelphia at the African American Museum on Friday August 3rd, 2012, highlighted the exciting stage line up at the 5th Annual ACANA African Festival on Sunday, August 5th, 2012 from 2:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. The festival took place at the River Stage on the Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing, a part of PECO Multicultural series.

Stage performances represented the African countries of Nigeria, Liberia, Congo,  Sierra Leone, and many others. They performed along with the musical sensation Bracket will be the sensational LIB Queen from Monrovia, Liberia, Rafiya, a Congolese artist, and Jay Q from Sierra Leone.

Other performers throughout the day included: Black Diamond, Peter Cole, Chillton Jah James, Rotimi & De Afrophonik Crew, and Sista Rose. Dance is also an important highlight of the ACANA African Festival. Also, taking the stage was the world famous Universal Dance & Drum Ensemble.

In previous years, ACANA Cultural Festival had brought on stage such big name artists like Maxi Priest of Jamaica, Trinidad’s queen of soca music Joan Tigress Rowley, as well as Liberia’s Gebah Swaray of the Safari Band. This year’s event featured Bracket who were set to repeat the success of the previous festivals, until they got rained in during their performance. See the below preview of concert.

Along with presenting sponsor, PECO, the festival is also sponsored by the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts through the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance, AfriQtalk, Brown Family Shop Rite, Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health, Children Crisis Treatment Center, , Arik Airlines, Western Union, Cozen O’Connor, Philadelphia Mayor’s Commission on African & Caribbean Immigrant Affairs, The Welcoming Center, Chester Ave. Business Association, Funtimes Magazine, Liberian United Women In Progress,  PNC Bank, and IT Solutions.

Bracket is one of the top selling contemporary Nigerian-style African-pop musicians. Bracket’s music is a composition of traditional Nigerian rhythms with contemporary pop and hip-hop influences.

Two Brides & a Baby USA Premiere and Screening by SnapFlix- Nollywood Cinema Series

THE NOLLYWOOD CINEMA SERIES KICKS OFF IN AMERICA WITH THE PREMIERE OF BLESSING EGBE’S ‘TWO BRIDES AND A BABY’ IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 2012.

Two Brides and a Baby is a must see movie. I really loved the way that this movie was brillantly done by Blessing Egbe, the cast were fantastic.  I love how Blessing was able to bring emotional nuance to her role in the movie.

Following the huge success of Nollywood films in cinemas across Africa and the UK, Movie lovers in the US, Canada and Caribbean can now enjoy Nollywood in American Cinemas courtesy of SnapFlix Incorporated, a distributor of African media content in the USA. The new brand, the ‘Nollywood Cinema Series’ is an ongoing showcase of new breed, top quality Nollywood movies (being referred to as the “New Nollywood”) in Cinemas across major cities in the Americas. The initial lineup of cities for the series include Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, DC/Maryland, Toronto and Kingston, Jamaica.

The series took off in style with a red carpet premiere event of the widely acclaimed, award-winning drama ‘TWO BRIDES AND A BABY’ on Saturday, April 14, 2012 at the Hill Auditorium, Woodruff Arts Center, 1280 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, Georgia 30309. TWO BRIDES AND A BABY’ is a beautifully crafted romantic comedy drama starring Stella Damasus, Kalu Ikeagwu, Keira Hewatch, O.C Ukeje, Chelsea Eze, Okey Uzoeshi and Blessing Egbe. It is written and produced by model/actress/producer Blessing Egbe and directed by the famous Nollywood director, Teco Benson.

The movie has received rave reviews and has to date received a total 16 nominations from ‘The Best of Nollywood Awards’ 2011, Abuja Film Festival 2011 and AMAA 2012. ‘TWO BRIDES AND A BABY’ also bagged 5 awards at the Best of Nollywood Awards in 2011, including awards for Best Director, Achievement in Sound, New Female Act, Best Screenplay and Movie of the year. The main cast and crew were in attendance and also at an exclusive after party at Cream Ultra Lounge (home of The African Experience) located at 3249 Buford Hwy, Atlanta, GA 30329. More details at www.snapflix.net.

SnapFlix also launches its brand new website WWW.SNAPFLIX.NET. The new website will provide information about Nollywood Cinema Series theater locations in each city, film schedules, show times and box office information for current and future showings of movies from the Nollywood Cinema Series. Visitors to www.snapflix.net will find the new site informative. Site visitors can watch trailers of current and upcoming films, get movie details, share and interact with friends on upcoming films using Facebook and Twitter, buy tickets for upcoming movie premiers and screenings, and get information about Snapflix and the Nollywood Cinema Series.

SnapFlix founders, Deji Eniojukan and Jide Akanbi say “This is a grand landmark for Nollywood and the beginning of a new revolution of film in African Entertainment Industry. We are meeting the entertainment needs of Africans and lovers of Africa in the diaspora, a need for a cinematic presence of Nollywood movies in North America. Launching a structured distribution of Nollywood films to American cinemas is filling a major gap in the industry, this is also key to ensuring the producers and content owners are able to recover quality returns thereby encouraging investment in the Nollywood Industry based on the performance of these quality films in American cinemas.

It’s a big breakthrough and it’s been a long journey, but we are excited about the future of Nollywood and we’re glad to be part of it”. Producer of TWO BRIDES AND A BABY; Blessing Egbe says “There is a proverb that goes ‘when one door closes, another opens’. I am excited that a new door has opened for Nollywood films in the US via Snapflix distribution. These are a new crop of distributors with good intent for content owners. They have unlocked the strong doors of some US theaters and I hope that thousands of Nollywood fans and supporters will walk through these doors to enjoy the selected movies showing in these theaters.

Producers will no longer face the problem of selling their content to some persons who take advantage of the laxity in mainstream distribution in the diaspora. I am happy for the innovation and look forward to the launch. I am even happier that my film is the one that will launch the series, Glory be to God!”

ABOUT SNAPFLIX/ THE NOLLYWOOD CINEMA SERIES

SnapFlix is a distributor of African and Caribbean media based in Atlanta, GA. A media and entertainment company with operations in USA and Africa, we distribute movies via multiple channels including theaters, online rentals and sales, wholesale to retail outlets, and streaming rights sales to legitimate online streaming companies for African and Caribbean content. SnapFlix is the media and entertainment subsidiary of Sinet Technologies Inc. (www.sinettechnologies.com), a global technology and media conglomerate with operations in US,Canada, Caribbean and Africa.

Snapflix’s operation encompasses film/music distribution, motion picture production, motion picture financing, and talent management. As organizers of the Nollywood Cinema Series, SnapFlix brings the new breed of high quality Nollywood/African movies to movie theaters in North America. Visit www.snapflix.net for more information. Fans can also stay updated via social media by following @snapflix on Twitter and by liking the Fan page at www.facebook.com/nollywoodcimenaseries.

SnapFlix Inc – Bringing the world to a big screen near you.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR PRESS INQUIRIES –

Please contact: Tosin Taiwo | Email: tosin@snapflix.net | Phone: 404.418.5400 |

info@snapflix.net |

WWW.SNAPFLIX.NET