Tag Archives: Princess Asha Okojie

The African Oprah

Amb. Princess Asha Okojie-Odigie, CPC, CAHIIM, CEO of AfriQtalk Consult, and Founder of FACE USA.

After building a career in entertainment, and media for almost fifteen years, Princess Asha Okojie-Odigie, path turned into cultural diplomacy, when she was appointed in 2013 by the former Ambassador/Consul General of Nigeria in Atlanta, GA, Geoffrey Teneilabe to serve as a Media Consultant for the Consulate General of Nigeria, and 17 Southeastern States of the United States and territory, under its jurisdiction, where she brought in project development perspective to the position and her passion as a community organiser, to promote the image, culture and interest of Africa, particularly, Nigeria.

Princess Asha wears many hats; She is a United Nations, Economic and Social Council Ambassador, U.S Ambassador of Culture, Edo State Ministry of Arts, Culture, Tourism and Diaspora Affairs, CEO of AfriQtalk Consulting, President and Founder of FACE  Global Leadership and Honors. She is also, a physician consultant and publicist to many high profiled clients, artists, celebrities, public and private sectors.

Having been nominated as the 2018 International Person of the year by USA-Africa Magazine, Princess Asha has received many awards, including Emerging African Leaders, Media Personality and Cultural Ambassador. She is known for strategic alliances, marketing partnerships, technical writing skills, and co-branding initiatives with selected public and private sectors, government organizations, foundations, businesses and diplomatic communities,

In 2010 she was elected into Stanford Who’s Who, U.S.A., an elite organization of selected executives, professionals and entrepreneurs from around the world as a result of her extraordinary efforts, in youth empowerment, trade/investment promotions and freelance journalism. She has routinely exhibited the enthusiasm, passion, vision and dedication, necessary to be considered among the best.

Princess Asha is often referred to as “The African Oprah”,  her style of interview, and photo journalism has been utilised by corporate companies, such as OTC (Oil Technology Conference), EXIM Bank (Export and Import Bank), Mayor Kasim Reed, office of international affairs, Nigerian Embassy, Washington DC, Jimmy Carter Centre, Universities and Nigerian organisations in the diaspora.

Princess Asha is also, a voice to recon with, she has interviewed public figures, like former President Jimmy Carter, Governor of Abia State, Dr. Okezie Ikpeazu, Sir Emeka Offor, 2Face, Bracket, Kalu Ikeagwu, Blessing Egbe, Olu Maintain, members of Nigerian National House of Assembly, Senators, Foreign Service Diplomats, to name but a few,.

With the goal to bridge the achievement and educational gap for sustainable economic and community development in Africa, Princess Asha is one of the most sought-after foreign direct investment, media and entertainment consultants in North America. She has initiated several medical missions, driving public-private partnerships (PPP) and made in Africa initiatives, tourism development, trade and investment conferences, to make available the necessary infrastructures, by encouraging policies and practices that promotes sustainable socioeconomic development and good governance.

Her commitment to service is evident in her passion in the promotion of African culture, women and youth empowerment and advocacy in Africa and African diaspora. This former beauty queen, and model is not a new face to the entertainment industry. She’s grace the cover of Magazine, done many TV ads and walked on runways for several fashion designers, and has featured on high profile print publications, television, and radio talk shows.

Princess Asha is a sickle cell advocate, who is committed to finding alternative traditional medicine for sickle cell disease through research in Nigeria. On her spare time, she enjoys writing poems, inspirational quotes, traveling, and mentorship. She is fun loving, and compassionate, a humanitarian who believes in volunteerism. Her devotion to God, and family keeps her going.

Princess Asha holds an Associate Degree in Arts, B.Sc. in Healthcare Administration and Management. A Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Information Management, Board Member of the International Forum for Sickle-Celled in the Diaspora (INFORSID), Advisory Committee Member of Women Empowerment Network (WOENET), Stakeholder Member of the Nigerian Diaspora Diagnostic & Trauma Foundation USA (NDDTF), Member of National Alliance of Medical Auditing Specialist, USA, and American Association of Professional Coders, U.S.A.

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Mama G Live at Miss Nigeria Cultural Pageant 2012, Miami, FL

We’re specialized in promoting African culture, art of fine living, entertainment and networking. We work with organizations, promoters, small businesses, independent artist, celebrities, beginners and established personalities. AfriQtalk is a market place for client referrals for the delivery of products, goods and services. We handle diverse range of PR projects, with the launching of our new platform, AfriQtalk African Treasures TV (ATAT); we are repositioning Africa in the 21st century.

MURPHY’S LAAW ENTERTAINMENT OFFICIALLY BRINGS MAMA TO THE US. MEET MAMA GEE UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL AT MISS NIGERIA FLORIDA CULTURAL PAGEANT, USA MIAMI. AFTER THE PARTY IS AN ALL WHITE AFTER PARTY. COME CELEBRATE MY AWARD BASH PARTY WITH ME, IZZY ENTERTAINMENT AND AFRIQTALK CREW IN THE HOUSE. OH LADIES DON’T FORGET TO BRING YOUR BEACH SWIM SUITES IT’S GOING TO BE OH MY GOSH…..CRUNKED UP! FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY.

AfriQtalk, Ras Kimono, Iktune Ny and Others wins award at the 2012 NPA USA Annual Summit

The 2nd edition of the Nigerian Promoters Association USA Entertainment Awards 2012 was held in AYVA  Center, Houston, Texas, May 25-27. The event was  filled with distinguished Nigerian celebrities, artists, models and ex-crowned beauties with a night of comedy and entertainment. The after party was hosted by Princess Belemzy at Face 2 Lounge, while the pre-award party was held at Zanzibar Lounge, Saturday May 26, 2012. Some of the award winners in attendance were  legendary Ras Kimono, Princess Asha okojie, Chisom Orgi, Emma Agu, Kenny Kay, Bolaji Dawodu, Eva Banks and Princess Belemzy.  (See full list below).

NPA Annual summit is an annual meeting of Entertainment Administrators who are members and non-members of NPA, such as; promoters, music producers, event planners, record label companies, Artiste managers, Deejays, Entertainment media personalities, film producers, fashion designers, Arts, sports e.t.c., coming together to share ideas and deliberate thoroughly on how to better improve the standard of Pan African Entertainment industry particularly in the North America.

NPA ENTERTAINMENT AWARD WINNERS

    CATEGORIES                                                                   WINNERS

1.         BEST MEDIA PERSONALITY                                Princess Asha Okojie

2.         BEST COLLABORATION                                        Kenny Kay

3.         BEST NEW ACT OF THE YEAR                            A Cue

4.         BEST GOSPEL MUSICIAN                                       Chisom Orji

5.         INDIGENOUS ARTIST OF THE YEAR     Yinka “Mr. Somebody” Quadri

6.         BEST R&B ARTIST OF THE YEAR                       Koleurz

7.         BEST DEEJAY OF THE YEAR (U.S.A)                Dj Donn

8.         BEST COMEDIAN OF THE YEAR                         Seyi Brown

9.         BEST FEMALE MUSIC VIDEO OF THE YEAR    Titi Lo’kei

10.      BEST NEXT RATED ARTIST                                   Popasay

11.       BEST MALE MUSIC VIDEO OF THE YEAR         Dking Rokan

12.       BEST POP ARTIST OF THE YEAR                         Gloria Maduka

13.       BEST AFRO HIPHOP ARTIST                                Maxpain

14.       BEST MALE ACT OF THE YEAR                          Oshine

15.       BEST RAP ARTIST OF THE YEAR                        Doggext

16.       BEST GOSPEL INSTRUMENTALIST                   Kelvin Najite

17.       BEST PROMOTER OF THE YEAR                         Adewole Lipede

18.       BEST ENT. PHOTOGRAPHER                              Trendy Africa

19.       ENT. PERSONALITY OF THE YEAR                   Emma Agu

20.       BEST MOVIE PRODUCER OF THE YEAR          Evalonia Banks

21.       BEST ACTOR OF THE YEAR                                  Pascal Atuma

22.       BEST ACTRESS OF THE YEAR                             Chisom OZ’ lee

23.       BEST MOVIE DIRECTOR                                        Oliver Mbamara

24.       BEST MOVIE OF THE YEAR                                  Jj Bunny-This is  Houston

25.       BEST ENT. BLOG SITE OF THE YEAR                Coscanino-Underdarock

26.       BEST ENT. WEBSITE OF THE YEAR                   Emma Agu-Iktune

27.       BEST MUSIC SINGLE                                               SLV

28.       BEST FEMALE MODEL OF THE YEAR                Eeefy Ike

29.       BEST REGGAE/DANCEHALL ACT                       Cola Man

30.       BEST INDIGENOUS INSTRUMENTALIST          Bunmi Omega

31.       BEST FEMALE ACT OF THE YEAR                       Naira

32.       BEST PARTY PROMOTER OF THE YEAR            Princess Belemzy

33.       BEST FASHION DESIGNER                                    Kachi Designs

34.       BEST INTERNATIONAL MUSIC ACT                   Naeto C

35.  BEST INT’L NOLLYWOOD ACT                                  Funke Akindele

36.  BEST PROMOTION COMPANY OF THE YEAR       Emaginethat Entertainment

NPA HONORS HOUSTON 2012

1.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         LANRE ARABA

2.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         BOLAJI DAWODU

3.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         RAS KIMONO

4.  ACHIEVEMENT AWARD                         BOLAJI AMUSAN

5.  HUMANITARIAN AWARD                      MARION AMANAMBU

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Love Don’t Hurt Stop The Violence Against Women

Do you know someone that might be in an abusive relationship? If so, tell them to walk away, and seek help because love don’t hurt. There are two types of domestic abuse, mental and physical abuse, which can result to low self esteem or control. Domestic violence can be defined as a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner. According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, women experience about 4.8 million intimate partner-related physical assaults and rapes every year. Less than 20 percent of battered women sought medical treatment following an injury.

Are men and  women equal? Take a listen to this video

Taking on violence against women in Africa By Mary Kimani

The incident was not unusual in Africa. In December 1998 a Kenyan police officer, Felix Nthiwa Munayo, got home late and demanded meat for his dinner. There was none in the house. Enraged, he beat his wife, Betty Kavata. Paralyzed and brain-damaged, Ms. Kavata died five months later, on her 28th birthday.

But unlike many such cases, Ms. Kavata’s death did not pass in silence. The Kenyan media covered the story extensively. Images of the fatally injured woman and news of her death generated nationwide debate on domestic violence. There followed five years of protests, demonstrations and lobbying by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), as well as by outraged men and parliamentarians. Finally, the government passed a family protection bill criminalizing wife-beating and other forms of domestic violence.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), violence affects millions of women in Africa. In a 2005 study on women’s health and domestic violence, the WHO found that 50 per cent of women in Tanzania and 71 per cent of women in Ethiopia’s rural areas reported beatings or other forms of violence by husbands or other intimate partners.

In South Africa, reports Amnesty International, about one woman is killed by her husband or boyfriend every six hours. In Zimbabwe, six out of 10 murder cases tried in the Harare High Court in 1998 were related to domestic violence. In Kenya, the attorney general’s office reported in 2003 that domestic violence accounted for 47 per cent of all homicides.
‘No boundaries’

Domestic violence is a global problem. In Europe, estimates the WHO, violence in the home is the primary cause of injury and death for women aged 16–44, more lethal than road accidents or cancer. Indeed, “violence against women,” said then-UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan in 1999, “knows no boundaries of geography, culture or wealth. It is perhaps the most shameful human rights violation.” And, he added, it is “perhaps the most pervasive.”

Violence against women goes beyond beatings. It includes forced marriage, dowry-related violence, marital rape, sexual harassment, intimidation at work and in educational institutions, forced pregnancy, forced abortion, forced sterilization, trafficking and forced prostitution.

Such practices cause trauma, injuries and death. Female genital cutting, for example, is a common cultural practice in parts of Africa. Yet it can cause “bleeding and infection, urinary incontinence, difficulties with childbirth and even death,” reports the WHO. The organization estimates that 130 million girls have undergone the procedure globally and 2 million are at risk each year, despite international agreements banning the practice.

Sexual violence is another problem. A local organization in Zaria, Nigeria, found that 16 per cent of patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were girls under the age of five, a sign of sexual assault. In the single year 1990, the Genito-Urinary Centre in Harare, Zimbabwe, treated more than 900 girls under 12 for STDs. Such assaults, observes a WHO publication, put “African women and girls at higher risk of sexually transmitted diseases [including HIV/AIDS] than men and boys.”
Rooted in culture

Abusers of women tend to view violence as the only way to solve family conflicts, according to a 1999 study on violence against women by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health near Baltimore, US. Perpetrators typically have a history of violent behavior, grew up in violent homes and often abuse alcohol and drugs.

However, violence against women, the Johns Hopkins study points out, goes beyond the brutalization of women by individuals. The prevalence of the phenomenon, “cuts across social and economic situations, and is deeply embedded in cultures around the world — so much so that millions of women consider it a way of life.”

In a report by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) in 2000, the agency noted that in interviews in Africa and Asia, “the right of a husband to beat or physically intimidate his wife” came out as “a deeply held conviction.” Even societies where women appear to enjoy better status “condone or at least tolerate a certain amount of violence against women.”

Such cultural norms put women in subservient positions in relation to their husbands and other males. That inferior status makes women “undervalued, disrespected and prone to violence by their male counterparts,” observed a 2003 report by the UN Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM). Ms. Radhika Coomaraswamy, the former UN special rapporteur on violence against women, agreed, noting that discriminatory norms, combined with economic and social inequalities, “serve to keep women subservient and perpetuate violence by men against them.”

Focusing specifically on Africa, Ms. Heidi Hudson found in a 2006 study by the South African Institute of Security Studies that “the subservient status of women, particularly rural women, in many African countries is deeply rooted in tradition.”

This is true to such an extent, Ms. Hudson added, that women can be perceived as objects or property, a view reflected especially clearly in practices such as wife inheritance and dowry payments.

Here are some ways to help a friend who is being abused:

  • Set up a time to talk. Try to make sure you have privacy and won’t be distracted or interrupted.
  • Let your friend know you’re concerned about her safety. Be honest. Tell her about times when you were worried about her.
  • Help her see that what she’s going through is not right. Let her know you want to help.
  • Be supportive. Listen to your friend. Keep in mind that it may be very hard for her to talk about the abuse. Tell her that she is not alone, and that people want to help.
  • Offer specific help. You might say you are willing to just listen, to help her with childcare, or to provide transportation, for example.
  • Don’t place shame, blame, or guilt on your friend. Don’t say, “You just need to leave.” Instead, say something like, “I get scared thinking about what might happen to you.” Tell her you understand that her situation is very difficult.
  • Help her make a safety plan. Safety planning includes picking a place to go and packing important items.
  • Encourage your friend to talk to someone who can help. Offer to help her find a local domestic violence agency.
  • Offer to go with her to the agency, the police, or court.
  • If your friend decides to stay, continue to be supportive. Your friend may decide to stay in the relationship, or she may leave and then go back many times. It may be hard for you to understand, but people stay in abusive relationships for many reasons. Be supportive, no matter what your friend decides to do.
  • Encourage your friend to do things outside of the relationship. It’s important for her to see friends and family.
  • If your friend decides to leave, continue to offer support. Even though the relationship was abusive, she may feel sad and lonely once it is over. She also may need help getting services from agencies or community groups.
  • Keep in mind that you can’t “rescue” your friend. She has to be the one to decide it’s time to get help. Support her no matter what her decision.
  • Let your friend know that you will always be there no matter what.

16 Celebrities Who Support The Cause to End Violence Against Women.

Celebrity Anti-VAW Campaigner Number 1: Annie Lennox

Young At Heart Poetry Vol 2. – When You

When you crossed my path, it never occurred to me you’ll be back again

When you danced with me,  I never noticed your weakness

When you held me close,  I never read your mind

When you laughed with me,  I didn’t see the hurt inside

When you asked for patience, I didn’t mean to be in a hurry

When you reached out for peace, I didn’t intend to fight war

When you cherished my world, I didn’t mean to shatter yours

When you applauded me, I danced from a distance

When you stood by me ,  I saw shadows behind

When you laid beside me, I heard our heart beat as one

When you kissed me, I realized how deep I’ve fallen

But when morning came, memories of yesterday became wishes of today

For you were gone without a trace into my dream of last night

 

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